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Why MLK is Important to the Marijuana Movement

Stuff Stoners Like takes activism seriously. Sure, we’re a bunch of stoners and we LOVE to smoke weed, but that doesn’t mean we’re ignorant. In fact, we’re students of history. And, we think in order to effectively fight the war on drugs takes a deep understanding and a great appreciation of our nation’s history. Just like us, those involved in the Marijuana Movement aren’t just fighting for legalization, we’re not just fighting for safe access and the ability to choose how we medicate, we’re not just battling stereotypes, discrimination, and injustice…in essence we’re struggling for CIVIL RIGHTS!

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Please tell Stuff Stoners Like you’ve read or heard that shit before! Those words sound familiar because they’re interwoven into the fabric of our great nation.  Right this very moment the Supreme Court of California is listening to arguments regarding the constitutionality of a ban on gay marriage in California, which ultimately will face the greatest court in the land soon. Where you stand is irrelevant…but from whatever vantage point you watch…you’ll witness whether or not a group of people will gain or lose civil rights. Marriage is the fabric of American life and excluding others from a part of American life can only create a cultural divide…but that’s another struggle. Here’s ours…people want to tell us how to medicate. In fact there are people out there who want to take away your right to medicate. And, as it stands today…many of you DO NOT EVEN HAVE THAT RIGHT!  The erosion of CIVIL RIGHTS frightens us as it should frighten YOU.

Think about it for a second…MLK was THE chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in THE civil rights movement. He successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. We LOVE and admire MLK because he fought for equal rights. And, that’s what we’re fighting for as well. We can only ever aspire to have a similar impact in America regarding the Marijuana Movement as we continue to fight for equal rights. The big difference; back then…people we’re out for blood and they murdered our leaders. Keep in mind, MLK was assassinated in 1968 because of his activism.

We’re no experts on the man, but that doesn’t mean that we’re not passionate, honest, and sincere when we say he’s one of our heroes. We’re inspired by MLK and we create this blog and participate in the Marijuana Movement in his honor. MLK fought against deep-rooted, unspeakable injustice and did it by preaching nonviolence. In his time, he was considered a subversive, just like you and I who medicate with marijuana, and he advocated for a complete revolution, just like you and I.

Recognizing King’s birthday and celebrating the day to commemorate him gives us great pride. The Civil Rights Movement has many parallels to our own. And, nothing reflects that point better than our Pipe Dream speech. Did you know that this federal holiday was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time just 10 years ago? Yeah, and you thought The Civil Rights Movement ended when MLK’s life did…back in 1968, didn’t you?

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  • John Schomisch

    I owned a party store for three years never drank a beer out of the cooler. My ex- still owns the store and will retire a welthy woman selling her drug of choice. I never drank,I always smoked. I would like to have the same respect offered to me as my country offers to her pertaining to my drug of choice.Cosidering its not by my standereds, even nearly as dangerouse to man kind as say beer.

  • ray christl

    MLK and Roger Christie/Marc Emery/Eddy Lepp etc.. are great men who gave their life ,so we could appreciate our own.

  • Faycless

    I however did not celebrate MLK’s birthday. He associated with communists, beat whores, and plagerized a lot of his speeches.